Bibliography: Democracy (page 595 of 596)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the I'm with Tulsi website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Karen Best, Donald P. Vetter, Daniel Aaron, Patricia Worgan, Francis E. Kazemek, San Diego. Univ. Extension. California Univ, Murry R. Nelson, Helen S. Hawkins, Department of the Interior Bureau of Education, and Robert C. Bradley.

Best, Karen; And Others (1979). Social Science Instructional Guides: Middle School. (Grades 6-8). The guide, part of a social science learning continuum from first through twelfth grades, contains outlines for two-semester social studies courses for grades 6, 7, and 8. The courses focus on the geographic setting, history, and cultures of the Americans and the need for inter-American cooperation. The guides for each course contain three components: time allocations for units, instructional objectives, and a content outline. The first semester (eighteen weeks) of grade 6 covers geographic concepts and skills, archaeology, map skills, research skills, and Canadian history. Three weeks of optional time are allowed. The second semester examines Eastern Canada, South America, the West Indies, Central America, and Mexico; optional time of one week is allowed. The first semester of Grade 7 is divided into three units: map and globe skills, weather and climate, and topography. The second semester is a regional study of the United States. The Grade 8 course contains seven American History units: America's Cultural Plurality, The First Americans, Colonial America, The American Revolution, democratic Government, Westward Expansion, and The Civil War Era. Descriptors: American Culture, American History, Archaeology, Colonial History (United States)

Roth, Jeffrey (1994). Teaching Democratic Theories of Education in El Salvador: Is the Laboratory Open?. A philosophy of education course focused on concepts of democratic education was taught to primary and secondary school teachers working in a private bilingual school in San Salvador (El Salvador). The teachers' school was an "International School" serving children of the wealthy and the educated who lived nearby. The course was designed so that the form and content of the course were congruent and the students could experience democratically organized debate and evaluation. The course goal was to read two recent texts on democratic education and to examine participants' beliefs and practices to see whether they assisted or impeded the formation of persons able to participate in civic debate. Observations of the responses of the participants to the entire course led to three conclusions: (1) teachers are not comfortable evaluating their peers, even when anonymity was assured; (2) teachers face a profound struggle in democratizing their workplace as expressed in final essays where participants reported that the course had made them more aware of their limited autonomy some of which they conceded was self-imposed; and (3) that the crafting of a philosophy of education can be justified on different grounds: vocational, professional, and collegial.   [More]  Descriptors: Course Content, Course Descriptions, Course Organization, Democracy

Bureau of Education, Department of the Interior (1920). Monthly Record of Current Educational Publications. Index: February, 1919-January 1920. Bulletin, 1920, No. 28. The present bulletin constitutes a complete author and subject index to the 2,312 entries contained in the 10 numbers of the Monthly Record of Current Educational Publications issued from February, 1919, to January, 1920, inclusive. The record was published each month during this period, with the exception of July and August. The references in the index are to the item numbers, which run consecutively through the 10 issues of the record for the year. This bulletin is designed to serve institutions and persons desiring to preserve a permanent bibliography of educational literature for 1919, which may be formed by binding the 10 numbers of the Monthly Record for the year with the index here presented. [Best copy available has been provided.] Descriptors: Bibliographies, Publications, Educational Administration, High Schools

Nelson, Murry R.; Singleton, H. Wells (1978). Governmental Surveillance of Three Progressive Educators. Governmental interference with academic freedom is illustrated by F.B.I. surveillance of and unauthorized distribution of information about progressive educators John Dewey, George Counts, and Harold Rugg. These three educators attracted the attention of governmental agencies and special interest groups during the 1930s and 1940s because they advocated educational reform and participated in liberal movements such as the ACLU and the NAACP. All three were suspected of communist leanings because they departed from traditional educational approaches and urged students and community members to become actively involved in social reconstruction. In their educational writings and in their courses at Columbia University and the University of Chicago, these educators introduced students to controversial issues such as the depression, labor-management relations, the distribution of wealth, and lifestyles in socialist countries. By 1941, the F.B.I. had gathered nearly 400 pages of information on the three progressive educators in the form of reports by private and governmental agencies, letters, articles, and clippings. The F.B.I. method of accumulating data was to collect any type of readily available information about the men, put the information in a file, and add to the file in a random manner from time to time. This investigative process, apparently without clear objective, made use of much false, partially true, and unsubstantiated information. The conclusion is that the F.B.I. investigations into the activities and writings of Dewey, Rugg, and Counts were capricious, unmethodical, unconfidential, and deleterious to freedom of speech.   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Freedom, Bias, Civil Liberties, Communism

Schuetz, Peter (1996). Political Culture in the School and Classroom: Preparation for Democratic Citizenship. Recognizing that civic education is the school subject specifically dedicated to preparing students for democractic citizenship and that the school and classroom often have a less than democratic and value-loaded "political culture," this paper emphasizes the fundamental goals of civic education and then arrives at the ingredients of political culture in the school and classroom that are favorable to preparing students for democratic citizenship. The three fundamental goals of civic education are: (1) helping students become self-confident, well informed citizens who are able to think rationally and who are committed to the values of human dignity and human rights; (2) fostering a willingness and capacity to participate in political affairs on local, national, and international levels; and (3) developing a strong recognition of the need to balance individualism and self-interest with human interdependence and social as well as environmental responsibility. To effectively prepare students for democratic citizenship, individual classrooms and schools, teachers and administrators must model democratic citizenship for and with their students in the classroom and school climate in terms of how all members of the school community communicate; by avoiding indoctrination at all levels; and through the types of learning and teaching methods used.   [More]  Descriptors: Citizen Participation, Citizenship Education, Civics, Curriculum Development

Kazemek, Francis E. (1984). Adult Literacy Education: An Ethical Endeavor. Many of John Dewey's ideas concerning ethics and the universalization of democratic habits of thought and action are especially relevant to a discussion of adult literacy as a means of developing social intelligence in a democratic society. Dewey's basic ethical principles are manifest in approaches to adult literacy education such as those conceived and practiced by Horton and the Highlander Folk School, Freire, Hunter and Harman, Coles, and Kozol. Particularly relevant to a discussion of the objectives of adult literacy education is Dewey's faith in the individual for intelligent and responsible action. The implications of a basic faith in people's ability to reflect and decide what is good for them in the structure of adult literacy programs are various. For example, this basic faith means that program developers and literacy teachers must come to grips with the individual's, community's, and instructor's beliefs, mores, and perceptions of reality, as well as with the manner in which these overlap and interact. Then, program developers should devise community-based programs centering on local needs and themes that emerge from individuals in the community. Descriptors: Adult Basic Education, Adult Educators, Adult Literacy, Adult Programs

Parrish, Michael E.; Hawkins, Helen S. (1975). American Issues Forum, Volume I: American Society in the Making. A Study Guide for Courses by Newspaper. The study guide is designed to be used with other instructional materials in a one-semester curriculum program which is linked to topics outlined in the American Issues Forum calendar. It is intended for use at the local level. In the course, students examine some of the principal conditions affecting the development of American ideas and institutions. The course focuses on the settlement of the North American continent, the changing patterns of the natural landscape, the emergence of a political ideology for a free society, and the formation of a democratic political structure. The issues are discussed in light of their bearing on the United States in 1976. Four units, which correspond to units in the reader and newspaper articles, comprise this study guide. They are A Nation of Nations; The Land of Plenty; Certain Unalienable Rights; and A More Perfect Union: The American Government. Each unit includes key concepts to consider, discussions of the newspaper articles and readings in the reader, study questions for the readings, and an annotated bibliography for each of the units. The guide concludes with a chronological time chart of events in U.S. history.   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Education, American Culture, American Studies, Annotated Bibliographies

Worgan, Patricia (1995). The Changing Relationship Between the State and Higher Education in the Czech Republic, Higher Education Management. This article examines the change from total state control in Czech higher education to its democratization after 1989. It compares elements in the two systems, including legislative control, institutional administration, academic freedom, teaching and research, employment policies, curriculum design, access to higher education, and funding. The paper concludes that the resulting decentralization has created some ambiguities in the system. Descriptors: Academic Freedom, Access to Education, Administrative Organization, Administrative Policy

Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Project Social Studies Curriculum Center. (1968). The Republican Age, 1760's-1820's. Grade Ten. Resource Unit II. Project Social Studies. The resource unit, developed by the University of Minnesota's Project Social Studies, is the second in a series of six units on continuity and change in American civilization. The unit deals with 18th century principles and their effects upon Americans. Key attention is given to the political system, development of the executive and, in particular, political party theory. The relationships of the political system with the economic and social systems are also stressed. The course is designed to teach attitudes and inquiry skills as well as generalizations and concepts. The inquiry approach to teaching is stressed. Preceding the main body of the unit are three sections on the following: 1) major historical points to be developed in the unit; 2) a list of unit objectives; and 3) content outline showing how different topics in American history can be used to teach the unit's major generalizations. The objectives, content, teaching procedures, and instructional materials to be used are specifically explained in the main body of the unit, and the relationship among these is made clear. Specific questions to facilitate classroom discussion are listed. A bibliography of student and teacher materials to be used in the course is also provided, however, many other materials can be used in lieu of those suggested. Related documents are SO 006 777-783.   [More]  Descriptors: Constitutional History, Course Objectives, Cultural Background, Curriculum Guides

California Univ., San Diego. Univ. Extension. (1975). American Issues Forum, Volume I: American Society in the Making. Courses by Newspaper: Community Leader's Guide, Newspaper Articles, [And] Examination Questions. These materials are designed to be used in a one-semester curriculum program which is linked to topics outlined in the American Issues Forum calendar. It is intended for use at the local level. Volume I, American Society in the Making, examines some of the principal conditions affecting the development of American ideas and institutions. It focuses on the peopling of the North American continent, the changing patterns of the natural landscape, the emergence of a political ideology for a free society, and the formation of a democratic political structure. The issues are discussed in light of their bearing on the United States in 1976. The community leader's source book contains resources related to each topic suitable for discussion, books to review, and an annotated film list. It is arranged according to topics as presented on the calendar from August 31 to December 20, 1975. The newspaper packet, divided into four units corresponding with the student reader and the study guide, includes 18 1,400-word articles with appropriate illustrations and biographies. Examination questions offer objective midterm and final tests for classroom use. These materials can be used in conjunction with the corresponding reader and the study guide.   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Education, American Culture, American Studies, Colonial History (United States)

Update on Law-Related Education (1996). Perspectives on Voting and Education from the Dole/Kemp Campaign. Stresses the Robert Dole/Jack Kemp campaign's recognition of the importance of the youth vote. Notes the efforts of the Republican National Party to involve youth in politics. Details a 10-point program, the "Education Consumers Warranty," that summarizes conservatives' approach to educational reform. Descriptors: Citizen Participation, Citizenship Education, Civics, Democracy

Howard County Board of Education, Clarksville, MD. (1970). A Curriculum Guide in Elementary Social Studies: Man in a Changing Society. Grade Five. This grade 5 social studies curriculum unit presents a course on Man In A Changing Society. An objective of the instructional program for this level is that the student broaden his perspective of the concept "man" from the family, community, and the state to understand his nation as a changing society. Units for study are: 1) A Nation Evolves From Immigration; 2) A Nation Emerges Through Conflict To A World Power; 3) Man and His Government; and, 4) Scarcity Is a Constant Reality (Optional). Format of the guide is consistent with this series, stating objectives and giving curriculum content in these major divisions: 1) Concepts; 2) Teaching Strategies; 3) Content and Materials; 4) Varieties in Strategies and Content; and 5) Evaluation. A specific objective of the fifth grade program is the improvement of social and academic skills through opportunities of individualized or small group work. Related documents are: SO 001 185 through SO 001 189.   [More]  Descriptors: Acculturation, Citizenship, Civil War (United States), Colonial History (United States)

Bradley, Robert C. (1997). "Citizens and Governance": An Alternative Approach to American Government, PS: Political Science and Politics. Presents the syllabus of an introductory U.S. government course. The course stresses alternative views on government including multiculturalism, grass-roots politics, social issues, class, race, and gender. Specifically, seeks to inculcate critical thinking and a global awareness. Includes a course outline, discussion of grading policies, and list of readings. Descriptors: Citizen Participation, Citizenship Education, Civics, Course Content

Vetter, Donald P.; And Others (1977). Government: Political Decision-Making. Decision-Making in Contemporary America, Unit IV. This unit on economic decision-making is the fourth of five units in a ninth grade social studies course (see SO 010 891). Major objectives are to help students (1) explain how dissent and protest may be used as effective means of change and to consider the consequences of such actions; (2) examine the judicial branch of government in order to generalize about how one's life has been affected by decisions of the courts; (3) examine the legislative branch in order to trace the process of decision making and identify the forces affecting the process; (4) analyze the executive branch in order to recognize the influences affecting executive decision-making; and (5) justify a political decision based on an analysis of the political process. The unit is divided into five parts: the first deals with dissent and protest; the second, third, and fourth examine the judicial, legislative, and executive branches of government on the local, state, and federal level. The last part focuses on the individual citizen and the citizen's influence on the political decision making process. The five parts contain lessons which are inquiry-oriented and are based on student activities. Each lesson contains a stated purpose, a classroom procedure, suggested materials, and teaching variations. Resource pages for activities are included. Descriptors: Cartoons, Civil Disobedience, Communication Skills, Constitutional History

Aaron, Daniel, Ed.; And Others (1975). American Issues Forum, Volume I: American Society in the Molding. A Courses by Newspaper Reader. This reader is designed to be used in a one-semester curriculum program which is linked to topics outlined in the American Issues Forum calendar. It is intended for use at the local level. Some of the principal conditions affecting the development of American ideas and institutions are examined. Focus is on the settlement of the North American continent, the changing patterns of the natural landscape, the emergence of a political ideology for a free society, and the formation of a democratic political structure. The issues are discussed in light of their bearing on the United States in 1976. The reader offers a selection of documents, essays, memoirs, poetry, and fiction. Divided into four units, its topics include A Nation of Nations; The Land of Plenty; Certain Unalienable Rights; and A More Perfect Union: The American Government. It contains well-known articles, such as "Red, White, and Black" by Nash; "The Promised Land" by Antin; "My Antonia" by Cather; "Man and Nature" by Marsh; the Bill of Rights from the U.S. Constitution; "Federalist No. 78" by Hamilton; and "The Imperial Presidency" by Schlesinger. This reader can be used in conjunction with the corresponding study guide, leader's source book, newspaper packet, and examination questions. Descriptors: Adult Education, American Culture, American Studies, Colonial History (United States)

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterPin on PinterestEmail this to someone

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *