Bibliography: Democracy (page 590 of 596)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the I'm with Tulsi website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include D. Alan Williams, F. John Zarlengo, Barbara R. Tyler, William Brown, Einar Thorsrud, Patricia Ferraro, Orono. New England – Atlantic Provinces – Quebec Center. Maine Univ, Washington Immigration and Naturalization Service (Dept. of Justice), Arne Cox, and Moses Stambler.

Stambler, Moses (1974). Characteristics and Innovations in American Education of Relevance for Indian Education. American responses to educational problems faced around the globe can serve as models for developing nations. The following characteristics of American education with particular relevance for education in developing nations have been organized as inputs, structures and strategies, and outputs. Inputs to the system of American education, defined in an historical context, include sociocultural pragmatism vs. long-range planning; centralization vs. decentralization; and democratic vs. elite education. Innovative structures and strategies provide the following: (1) new ways of perceiving the educational process, for instance the accountability movement; (2) new housing for education, such as open classrooms; (3) new values–humanistic vs. manpower; (4) expanded participation in the educational decision-making process by students, professionals, parents, and other interest groups; (5) variety in instructional level organization, including the nongraded approach; (6) learning how to learn; and (7) examination of the process of educational change itself. The output of American education is no longer being absorbed by the society. More emphasis on humanistic programs could counteract this situation. Human experience with educational problems should be incorporated into a world information pool on education strategies.   [More]  Descriptors: Community Involvement, Comparative Education, Cross Cultural Studies, Decentralization

Maine Univ., Orono. New England – Atlantic Provinces – Quebec Center. (1972). Canada and the United States–Government and Political Parties–A Comparison. A Learning Activity Packet. In this Learning Activity Packet (LAP) students, mostly in small groups, analyze and compare a few major features of the Canadian and American governments. The LAP is divided into six learning objectives: 1) Both the United States and Canada are sovereign nations. What is sovereignty? What are nations?; 2) People throughout the world are governed in many ways. Canada and the U.S. are very much alike.; 3) What is a leader? What kinds of leadership exists in your group? How does a leader gain his position? In what ways is a leader needed? Nations have leaders. What do they do? In what different styles do they lead? Are all leaders good leaders? Why not?; 4) If people are to live under governments, how do they protect themselves from allowing the leaders and government from becoming too powerful?; 5) How are leaders chosen? How do you choose the leaders of your group? How do countries choose their leaders? U.S. and Canada? State or province?; and, 6) What is federalism? How does it work? What are similarities between the two countries. Each objective is accompanied by suggested learning activities. Some other LAPs are SO 006 140-145.   [More]  Descriptors: Activity Units, Autoinstructional Aids, Civics, Comparative Analysis

Williams, D. Alan (1976). Road to Independence: Virginia, 1763-1783. A history of the state of Virginia from 1763 to 1783 is presented. Intended for use in the public schools of Virginia, the publication was prepared to assist educators in developing topics of study relating to Virginia's role in the American Revolution and to help students develop deeper appreciation for their rich heritage. The study is divided into five parts. Part I, "1763: The Aftermath of Victory," relates Virginia's political philosophy and tells of Britain's difficulties in meeting the costs of victory over other contenders for influence in North America. Part II, "From Revolution to Independence," chronicles the decaying political relations between Britain and the colonies between 1763 and 1775. Part III, "From Revolution to Independence," describes the First Virginia Convention and the First Continental Congress and gives an account of Virginia's position as a free and independent state. Part IV, "The Commonwealth of Virginia," describes military and economic activities from 1776-1782. Part V, "The War For Independence," includes information on the continental army, the Indian wars, the invasion of Virginia, and Virginia's participation in the siege at Yorktown. A bibliography, appendix, and a copy of the Declaration of Independence are included.   [More]  Descriptors: American Culture, American Studies, Civics, Civil Liberties

Tufts Univ., Medford, MA. Lincoln Filene Center for Citizenship and Public Affairs. (1969). Catalogue of Materials. This catalogue lists resource materials available to secondary social studies teachers using an inductive approach and multi-media techniques to create a variety of learning experiences. Seven supplemental classroom instructional programs were developed by the Center: 1) Dimensions of Citizenship; 2) Politics and Policy Making; 3) Urban Problems and Prospects; 4) The American Economic System; 5) American Civilization and History; 6) The Law and Citizenship; and, 7) The International System; Themes and Decisions. Materials are described for each of these areas with 20 different teacher guides available on such topics as: 1) Effective Citizenship: Upton Sinclair and The Jungle; 2) Citizenship Denied: Diary of a Young Girl; 3) Choosing a President, 1968: The American Political Process; 4) The Police: Fact and Fiction; 5) Conflict: A Game of American Life. Student narratives (reprints of case studies or excerpts of primary sources) are also available for many of the units. Instructional aids offered in this program have been produced through cooperative efforts of experienced high school teachers, the staff of Lincoln Filene Center, and Center consultants. Prices are given and an order form appended.   [More]  Descriptors: Annotated Bibliographies, Audiovisual Aids, Citizenship, Civics

Immigration and Naturalization Service (Dept. of Justice), Washington, DC. (1973). Federal Textbook on Citizenship. English and State Government. Home Study Course. Section 3 for the Student. Revised 1973. This federal home study textbook for naturalization candidates on the subject of state government serves as a vehicle for English language practice for the person with little or no skill in reading and should be used in conjunction with "English and State Government for the Helper (Section 3)." Each chapter contains factual information and exercises reinforcing the student's comprehension of main ideas. The twenty chapters introduce the function and structure of state governments, including the legislative, executive and judicial branches. Also described are the state government's protective and educative functions. The plan and function of city and county governments are presented as well as the means by which all governments are supported–tax dollars. A description of interaction among governments and between government and citizens is concluded by a summation of the principles of American government. A key to the mail-in exercises and a vocabulary list supplement the lessons.   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Education, Adult Programs, Citizenship, City Government

Coe, Rose Marie (1971). Social Studies: Politics and You. This course of instruction, intended as an elective course for grades 10 through 12, is one of a series of curriculum guides revised to fit the quinmester administrative organization of schools. The principal goals of the course are to: 1) motivate students, soon able to vote, toward participation in the American political process; and, 2) teach them understanding of the workings of the American political process. The guide is arranged into four sections. Section 1 lists eight goals for the course. Section 2 outlines course content and includes units on politics, citizens, the political party system, the structure and functions of political parties, the convention, campaign, elections, citizens roles, and evaluation of the American political party system. Section 3 lists objectives and learning activities for each unit, requiring student participation. Section 4 provides a bibliography of resource materials dating from 1955 through 1971, the majority of which are recent materials, for students and teachers. Related documents are SO 002 208 through SO 002 718.   [More]  Descriptors: Activity Units, Behavioral Objectives, Citizenship, Civics

Pool, Ithiel de Sola, Ed.; And Others (1973). Handbook of Communication. Each of the 31 chapters which comprise this volume reviews the state of the art in a specific area of communications research. The chapters are grouped into three sections, the first of which focuses upon the basic communication process. An introduction to the concept of a communication system and to the phenomena of language and nonverbal communication is followed by considerations of mass media and their audiences and of interpersonal communication. Additional chapters deal with the impact of communication on children and with persuasion and propaganda. Part II examines the communication process in a variety of settings. These include the mass media, small groups, bureaucracies, advertising, political parties and scientific institutions. Individual chapters explore the role of communication in each of these settings in advanced industrial society and compare communication in a Western democratic environment with its operation in Communist nations, the developing world, and in relations between states. Part III reviews current methods of communication research, particularly aggregate data analysis and experimental studies of communication effects. Descriptors: Audiences, Bureaucracy, Children, Communication (Thought Transfer)

Zarlengo, F. John (1969). Military Power in a Democratic Society. Teacher and Student Manuals. This unit focuses on the classic problem of the place of military power in a democratic society. Early sections examine the relationship between civil and military authority as developed in colonial America and written into the Constitution. The second half of the unit invites consideration of the relevance and workability of the earlier tradition of civil supremacy in a modern world of total war, technological complexity, and enormous military budgets. Students deal with the controversy over civilian control of the Atomic Energy Commission, the Truman-MacArthur clash, the right to conscientious objection, the possibilities for a military take-over in the United States, and current problems of both the legislative and executive branches in dealing with military power. (See SO 000 161 for a listing of related documents.)   [More]  Descriptors: Civil Liberties, Colonial History (United States), Democracy, Democratic Values

Cox, Arne (1974). The Personnel Function Today–Trends for the Future. The personnel function in industrial society has been marked by crisis, reappraisals, struggles for power, and guilty conscience. The profession is again under pressure; company management often questions its contribution to the solution of strategic personnel matters, while employees and their unions question its values, and wish to place its actions under the control of the employees. The description of the present situation must be based on tendencies toward change which have already had effect. Some of the tendencies which we may observe in action at present and which will influence personnel work in the future include: (1) movement toward a postindustrial society, with industry's principal branch being services and the basic conflict between the capital owner and the worker giving way to conflict between the professional and the layman; (2) movement toward a realignment of power, between the company and society and within companies, prompting considerable personal development on the part of employees and necessitating new company organization; (3) movement toward a more humane technology; and (4) movement toward a more open and more flexible company organization. Personnel officers must become realistic specialists in people, able to analyze values and processes of change in different situations.   [More]  Descriptors: Democracy, Developed Nations, Employee Attitudes, Employer Attitudes

Thorsrud, Einar (1974). Development and Utilization of Human Resources; A General View. Participation in industrial change is a hot issue in countries experiencing rapid social change. Major problems include the number of large, highly centralized organizations; people's changing values; work-education and industrial-welfare gaps; the absence of forms to replace unacceptable authoritarian control; the effects of electronic information and communications systems; the bureaucratization of trade unions and professional associations; and the development of "specialist power." We face the colossal task of redesigning major parts of the industrialized world, to set in motion the learning and development process that may spring us from our self-created trap. First, one technology cannot any more be taken as given; second, we must debureaucratize the work organizations and their interrelated institutions. Modern technology makes possible much smaller, simpler, and efficient factories, superior in social terms; they require changes in our basic ideas of work and education. To prevent technological and economic planning from taking precedence over social criteria, a participative design process must take place, in which the roles of specialists are changed. It is possible to choose between basically different forms of work organization.   [More]  Descriptors: Bureaucracy, Change Strategies, Cooperative Planning, Democracy

Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Project Social Studies Curriculum Center. (1968). The Civil War and Reconstruction. Public Domain Edition. Grade Ten. Resource Unit IV. Project Social Studies. The tenth-grade resource unit, developed by the University of Minnesota's Project Social Studies, is the fourth in a series of six units on continuity and change in American civilization. The attempt to apply the egalitarian ideology of the Democratic Age to the Negro and the ramifications of this attempt upon the political system are analyzed. The Civil War is examined as a case study of a political system in times of crisis. The course is designed to teach attitudes and inquiry skills as well as generalizations and concepts. The inquiry approach to teaching is stressed. Preceding the main body of the unit are three sections on the following: 1) major historical points to be developed in the unit; 2) a list of unit objectives; and 3) content outline showing how different topics in American history can be used to teach the unit's major generalizations. The objectives, content, teaching procedures, and instructional materials to be used are specifically explained in the main body of the unit, and the relationship among these is made clear. Specific questions to facilitate classroom discussion are listed. A bibliography of student and teacher materials to be used in the course is listed; however, many other materials can be used in lieu of those suggested. Related documents are SO 006 777-783.   [More]  Descriptors: American Culture, Civil Rights, Civil War (United States), Course Objectives

Tyler, Barbara R.; Biesekerski, Joan (1971). You, Too, Can be a Legislator! English, Debate, American History. The purpose of this quinmester course is to engage secondary students into acting out the role of legislators, requiring them to practice effective extemporaneous speaking, prepared public speaking, and congressional debating techniques. A full understanding of specific parliamentary procedures and methods used in the federal legislative branch is also required. Objectives of the course are for students to: 1) examine the basic techniques used in preparation and delivery of a persuasive speech; 2) construct a mock legislature; 3) formulate a bill reflecting a specific point of view on a current issue of considerable public interest; 4) debate the issues involved in a specific bill; 5) synthesize all points of view expressed in the legislative debates. It is hoped that by the end of the course the student will realize that legislation is a long and careful process which prevents hasty law making. Legislation is seen as an avenue for solution of problems in society and a process that will insure the success of our American government. Student and teacher bibliographies are provided including textbooks, films, records, and tapes in the list of resources. Related documents are: SO 002 708 through SO 002 718, and SO 002 768 through SO 002 792.   [More]  Descriptors: Activity Units, Behavioral Objectives, Civics, Curriculum Guides

Ferraro, Patricia; And Others (1971). Social Studies: A Nation Divided Against Itself. This curriculum guide, designed for the quinmester system, is an aide to secondary grade teachers as they plan instructional programs, and takes into account students' needs, available resources, and other factors. Objectives of this course of study are for the student to understand the causes and issues that led to the Civil War, the course and strategies of that war, and the results of the struggle. It is hoped that a conceptual transfer of learning occurs whereby students gain insight into today's issues that divide America and acquire suggestions about their resolution. One main idea is to make students aware that there are ways of resolving social, political, and economic differences within a nation peacefully, but if differences are not settled amicably war sometimes occurs. Included is a list of: review activities, textbooks, paperbacks, pamphlets, supplementary books, film resources, multi-media resources, captioned filmstrips, records and teaching tapes. Related documents are: SO 002 708 through SO 002 718, and SO 002 768 through SO 002 792.   [More]  Descriptors: Activity Units, Behavioral Objectives, Civil War (United States), Concept Teaching

Brown, William; And Others (1975). The Bicentennial American History Series. Designed to supplement secondary United States history courses, this resource booklet provides materials on four dramatic incidents in American history. The four events under examination include the Boston Massacre, the Denmark Vesey Slave Revolt, the Republic Steel Strike of 1937, and the Berlin Airlift of 1948. Each unit contains social background to the event, a description of the events leading to the incident, a description of what happened, a summary of important outcomes of the incident, a list of suggested student activities, related matters for consideration, and a bibliography. The related matters for consideration include additional student activities, value-oriented discussion questions, and appropriate instructional strategies on related political, economic, and social concepts inherent in the events. The unit on the Republic Steel strike may be integrated into economics or sociology courses since the strike reflects attitudes, ideas, and actions of labor, management, and government. Since the Berlin airlift unit explores the powers of the presidency in the area of foreign policy, it may be used in political science or international relations courses.   [More]  Descriptors: Black History, Class Activities, Democracy, Foreign Policy

Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Project Social Studies Curriculum Center. (1968). The Democratic Age, 1820's-1840's. Grade Ten. Resource Unit III. Project Social Studies. The resource unit, developed by the University of Minnesota's Project Social Studies, is the third in a series of six units on continuity and change in American civilization. The social system of the democratic age (1820-1840) is investigated with emphasis on voluntary associations which pioneered social reforms. Changes in the executive branch under Jackson and conflicting theories about the factors which brought about the growth of democratic thought are also examined. The course is designed to teach attitudes and inquiry skills as well as generalizations and concepts. The inquiry approach to teaching is stressed. Preceding the main body of the unit are three sections on the following: 1) major historical points to be developed in the unit; 2) a list of unit objectives; and, 3) content outline showing how different topics in American history can be used to teach the unit's major generalizations. The objectives, content, teaching procedures, and instructional materials to be used are specifically explained in the main body of the unit, and the relationship among these is made clear. Specific questions to facilitate classroom discussion are listed. A bibliography of student and teacher materials to be used in the course is listed, however, many other materials can be used in lieu of those suggested. Related documents are SO 006 777-783.   [More]  Descriptors: Course Objectives, Cultural Background, Curriculum Guides, Democracy

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