Bibliography: Democracy (page 588 of 596)

This annotated bibliography is compiled and customized by the Center for Positive Practices for the I'm with Tulsi website.  Some of the authors featured on this page include Alexander N. Charters, Rick Arnold, Barbara B. Burn, Carlos Marcelo, Richard Brosio, William Brescia, George Abbott, Frances C. Fowler, Diane U. Eisenberg, and Harrisburg. Pennsylvania State Library.

Chetley, Andrew (1990). The Power To Change: The Experience of the Costa Atlantica Project in Colombia (1977-1989). In 1977, the Bernard van Leer Foundation began supporting a project in Colombia that had the objective of improving the quality of early childhood care and education in a small village. The Costa Atlantica project offered an approach to development that was based on community organization, social management, participation, cooperation, popular education, and solidarity in the search for the common good. The project began as an attempt to satisfy the needs of children and expanded to include an alternative approach to overcoming poverty. The project team of about 25 people was aided by university students, and received encouragement and partial financial support from the Colombian Institute for Family Welfare. The team claimed to have provided over 100 communities with some form of preschool and a variety of other developments. Such a claim indicated that something in the communities was transforming largely marginalized and disadvantaged settings into positive developmental environments. This book describes the heart and spirit of the Costa Atlantica project. Chapters concern background information, the role of the university as change agent, the role of the community in development, the transition from local experiment to national policy, and the learning that took place during the experience.   [More]  Descriptors: Change Agents, Community Development, Community Role, Democracy

Brescia, William, Ed. (1982). Choctaw Tribal Government: A New Era. The first in a series of planned secondary curriculum materials about the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, the book traces Choctaw tribal government from before seventeenth century contact with the French to the present day. Chapter I treats tribal government in the period before contact with the French, when Choctaw family structure and relationships were well defined. Chapter II discusses the course of the seventeenth and eighteenth century French alliance with the tribe. Chapter III details a series of United States-Choctaw treaties dating from 1786 and including the 1830 Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek which resulted in the removal of many of the Choctaw to Oklahoma. Chapter IV described the tribe's "dark ages" between 1830 and the 1921 colonization operation of the Choctaw Agency. The chapter also describes the 1944 declaration of the Choctaw Reservation, the re-emergence of tribal government and its 1975 reorganization, and the new spirit of self-determination and economic development that exists today. The chapter contains biographies of five tribal leaders. Appendices contain the text of nine treaties and the revised tribal by-laws and constitution. The book, written by tribal members and scholars, is illustrated with black-and-white photographs and maps.   [More]  Descriptors: American Indian Culture, American Indian History, American Indian Reservations, American Indian Studies

Doris Marshall Inst. for Education and Action, Toronto (Ontario). (1989). Educating for a Change. A Skillshop for Immigrant Community Educators. Workshop Manual. This manual provides materials for a 6-day workshop for immigrant women working on the issue of woman abuse; it is intended to help them do their own programs in their own language out of their own cultural context. Objectives of the course are as follows: to increase educator skills and confidence in (1) developing learning activities and using available resources; (2) designing new community education programs on the issue of woman abuse/wife assault; and (3) facilitating group activities that draw on participants' experiences, introduce information, analyze problems and issues, and develop action plans. Section A is a broad overview of the course, its objectives, and the assumptions on which it was based. Section B details each day or stage of the course. For each stage, these components are provided: a restatement of the objectives and agenda for each session, brief description of the process, task sheets for the activities used, detailed explanations of some activities, and the material produced by the participants. Session titles are as follows: What's It All About; Surveying the Terrain; Ten Finger Typing: Activities and Tools; Designing an Activity and Workshop Model; On Stage: The Practice of Facilitation; and Covered Ground and Next Steps. The final section summarizes the methods of evaluation built into the course. Descriptors: Adult Education, Battered Women, Change Agents, Change Strategies

Brosio, Richard (1994). "Staying Alive": Intellectual and Spiritual Sustenance on the Journey for Critical Foundations Scholars-Teachers. This paper is a description and discussion of the author, a critical Social Foundations scholar-teacher, and the craft/intellectual/emotional/moral/identity sources that sustain his work. Opening paragraphs describe his family background in the Piedmont province of northern Italy, the Turin (Italy) working class and their attitudes toward work. The scholar-teacher argues that these antecedents give rise to his own commitment to the democratic principle that seeks to make private power answerable to the public good. Further paragraphs discuss the ideas and influence on the scholar-teacher of Cesare Pavese, Albert Camus, Nikos Kazantzakis, Antonio Gramsci, and Karl Marx. A later section describes the scholar-teacher's scholarly career in the Social Foundations of Education which has included work on Dewey and capitalist education. A concluding paragraph returns to Marx and argues that Marx's translation of the abstract conceptions of 19th century political economy into concrete terms of human social relations allowed him to form a model of modern bourgeois society and the whole regime of capital that continues to be valuable today. (Contains 34 endnotes.)   [More]  Descriptors: College Faculty, Democracy, Democratic Values, Educational Development

Charters, Alexander N., Comp.; Abbott, George, Comp. (1992). Adult Education Sound and Video Recordings–E. S. Bird Library. This publication lists items from the sound and video recording collection in the area of adult and continuing education in Bird Library, Syracuse University (Syracuse, New York). The major categories are sound recordings and video recordings. The items are listed in numerical order by call number. The following information is provided for sound recordings: title, author, source, and running time. Title, author, and source are listed for video recordings. A personal name index to sound and video recordings is appended.   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Education, Audiotape Recordings, Bibliographies, Citizenship Education

Arnold, Rick; And Others (1991). Educating for a Change. Intended for educators, this book aims to build their skills and confidence as they educate for social change. Chapter 1 is about strategy–factors to consider before getting involved in an educational program. It discusses the importance of putting oneself as an educator into the picture and of analyzing the broader social context in which educators' work takes place. Chapter 2 draws from the authors' experience in designing educational events so they meet the objectives people bring to them. A discussion on planning an educational program concludes with a checklist for effective design. Chapter 3 focuses on educational activities with examples of some that have been found useful. Each activity has these components: why use it?, time it takes, what one needs, how it is done, variations, and source. Chapter 4 concerns facing the challenges of facilitating a group, making the most of who one is, and working through conflicting agendas. Chapter 5 looks back at some things the authors learned from past experiences. It examines the power relations inherent in learning situations and considers the question of how one might increase one's impact on the processes of social change. Chapter 6 looks forward to challenges of the 1990s–economic, political, social, and cultural and ideological. A postscript contains a discussion of the authors as they neared the end of the writing process and comments from colleagues who read the manuscript. The bibliography lists 45 publications.   [More]  Descriptors: Adult Education, Change Agents, Change Strategies, Check Lists

Pennsylvania State Library, Harrisburg. (1990). Governor's Forums on Library and Information Services. Prepared for distribution to participants in the Pennsylvania Governor's Forums on Library and Information Services, this booklet contains the following items: letters of welcome from Governor Robert Casey and Barbara Bruno, Chair of the Steering Committee; an agenda; and descriptions of Pennsylvania's libraries, its statewide library service, and the names of library networks in Pennsylvania. Summaries of six conference papers and lists of related discussion issues are also provided: (1) "Building Library Resources for a Free Society" (Virginia M. Crowe) (2) "Creating a Literate Society Using Library Resources" (Kathryn Stephanoff); (3) "Increasing Productivity Through Information Technology" (Toni Carbo Bearman); (4) "Pennsylvania Citizens: Their Needs and Expectations" (Bernard Vavrek); (5) "Pennsylvania's Libraries: The Problems and Promises. Facilities, Materials, Personnel" (H. E. Broadbent III and Virginia Crowe); and (6) "Pennsylvania's Libraries: The Problems and Promises. Funding of Library and Information Services" (Toni Carbo Bearman and H. E. Broadbent III). The booklet concludes with a short list of library and information science acronyms and abbreviations and the names of conference planning committee members and other assisting members. It is noted that 14 Governor's Forums were held in 1990 to gather local input on the issues of concern to library and information users in the various regions of the state. This input was sent to the Governor's Conference, which, in turn, provided input for delegates to the White House Conference on Library and Information Services in July 1991.   [More]  Descriptors: Academic Libraries, Democracy, Elementary Secondary Education, Higher Education

Hurn, Christopher J.; Burn, Barbara B. (1982). An Analytic Comparison of Educational Systems: Overview of Purposes, Policies, Structures and Outcomes. Comparative Overview/Comparative Assessment. This comparative evaluation of the differing educational systems in North America, Europe, the USSR, and Japan examines the goals and values of these systems. It is pointed out that Americans value equality, practicality, and utility and that they are both individualistic and suspicious of government authority. Contrasts between these values and those implicit in the societies in Western Europe, Russia, and Japan are explored. The structure and organization of educational systems is also discussed. Judgments are offered concerning the effective locus of power in such matters as school organization, curriculum, and personnel policies. The Soviet Union, France, and Japan are identified as highly centralized systems and comparison is made between the structure of these sytems and those of Western Europe (mixed local, regional, and central control), and America and Canada, where local control is usually decisive. The selectivity of these systems is discussed as they reflect cultural attitudes toward the upward mobility of citizens. Differences and similarities in educational outcomes and policy implications between the systems are are also pointed out, and special consideration is given to changes in attitudes toward schooling over the past few decades. Appendix I contains an analysis of science and mathematics education in the Soviet Union and Japan. Appendix II discusses equivalencies in secondary schooling in the United States, Canada, Japan, the Soviet Union, Japan, and West Germany. Statistics on school enrollments are presented in tabular format.    [More]  Descriptors: Academic Standards, Access to Education, Communism, Comparative Education

Doris Marshall Inst. for Education and Action, Toronto (Ontario). (1988). Educating for a Change. A Skillshop for Community Educators. Workshop Manual. This manual provides materials for a 5-day course in the development of design and facilitation skills for participants. The course is intended for community educators who work in the areas of immigrant settlement, cultural interpretation, or wife assault and have responsibilities for leading group discussions or running educational programs. Section 1 provides a broad overview of the course and its objectives. Section 2 details each day or stage of the course. For each stage, these components are provided: a restatement of the objectives and agenda for each session, brief description of the process, task sheets for activities used, detailed descriptions of some activities, and material produced by the participants. Session titles are as follows: What's It All About?; Surveying the Terrain; Ten Finger Typing: Activities and Tools; Designing an Activity and Workshop Model; On Stage: The Practice of Facilitation; and Covered Ground and Next Steps. The final section summarizes the methods of evaluation built into the course. Descriptors: Adult Education, Battered Women, Change Agents, Change Strategies

Fowler, Frances C. (1990). One Approach to a Pluralist Dilemma: Private School Aid Policy in France, 1959-1985. Information about the French policy of government aid to private schools is presented in this report to promote understanding in the United States of the pluralist dilemma raised by the private school aid issue. An historical longitudinal policy evaluation involved document analysis and interviews with 16 French policy actors. The French policy is unlikely to serve as a model for American educational policy, although judged according to American criteria, the French policy was successful in that it provided free choice, was cost effective, and did not create segregation. However, cultural differences hindering implementation in the United States include the American perception of private schools' superiority, a political system based on separation of powers, and religious pluralism. A conclusion is that any unregulated program is politically dangerous because the private school aid issue is potentially divisive, raising the problem of autonomy and control; posing basic questions about the relationships among state, church, and family; and revealing inherent tensions among the democratic values of freedom, equality, and solidarity. An added factor in the United States is the racial issue. (53 references) Descriptors: Constitutional Law, Cultural Pluralism, Democracy, Democratic Values

Marcelo, Carlos (1994). An Overview of the Spanish Educational Reform and Teachers' Work. This paper describes the general features of educational reform in Spain that emphasize increased school autonomy and teacher collaboration and professionalization and have been initiated since 1978 when a new constitution was democratically approved. The first section which offers background to the reforms describes the general impact of the new constitution, general education law from 1979 to 1990, and incorporation into the European Community in 1986. The second section looks at teachers in Spain and their generally low social and historical status and the challenges to teacher professionalization. The education reform's aims and structure are described as being for personal education, parent participation, equity between the sexes, development of critical and creative capacities, encouragement of democratic habits, school autonomy, and professional development for teachers. The current curriculum development is described as coherent with a tradition of centralization of curricular decisions. The next section describes the new requirement that teachers in schools collaborate to specify and complement the curriculum through a curricular project. This requirement is a new and challenging demand for teachers who have traditionally worked in isolation. A discussion of school leadership under reform describes principals' election by local school boards and the effects of this change. A final section discusses the changing concept of the teacher under reform. Contains 12 references.   [More]  Descriptors: Cooperation, Curriculum Design, Decision Making, Democracy

Eisenberg, Diane U., Ed. (1983). Shaping Civic Values in a Technological Age: Public and Private Challenges. Toward a National Dialogue. Conference Report and Discussion Guide on the Jennings Randolph Forum (2nd, Washington, District of Columbia, May 8-10, 1983). Designed as a resource for community program planners and teachers, this publication reports the highlights of a national conference on civic values in the technological age and provides guidelines for planning community discussions on the topic. Following an introduction, four sections of conference highlights are presented in a uniform format: suggested discussion questions, excerpts of conference papers or debate, community program suggestions, and recommended resources and readings. The first section, the keynote address, concerns the erosion of the concept of public service. Suggested community programs include forums on the impact of the news media and communication technology on citizen participation. The second section outlines conference papers addressing the impact of technology on the constitutional system. Citizenship skills needed for the future, and past and future adaptations of the Constitution are considered. Community programs commemorating the United States Constitution bicentennial are recommended. In the third section, the question of who bears responsibility for shaping civic values is debated. School, government, business, and news media roles in social value formation are explored. Discussion questions focus on educational quality and reform. The fourth section examines the potential impact of communication technologies on the political process and citizenship. After these highlights, a concluding section outlines conference recommendations for a national dialogue. Lists of conference speakers and attendees are appended. Descriptors: Citizen Participation, Citizenship Education, Civics, Community Programs

Vigilante, David (1991). The Constitution in Crisis: The Red Scare of 1919-1920. A Unit of Study for Grades 9-12. This unit is one of a series that represents specific moments in history from which students focus on the meanings of landmark events. Continuing narrative provides context for the dramatic moment. By studying a crucial turning-point in history, students become aware that choices had to be made by real human beings, that those decisions were the result of specific factors, and that they set in motion a series of historical consequences. The lessons are based on primary sources, taken from documents, artifacts, journals, diaries, newspapers, and literature from the period under study. By analyzing primary sources, students will learn how to analyze evidence, establish a valid interpretation, and construct a coherent narrative in which all the relevant factors play a part. This unit is designed to help students recognize that the guarantees of the Bill of Rights are fragile and must be secured by a commitment to principles. When exaggerated fears of political, racial, or ethnic groups are encouraged, the basic freedoms of Americans can be lost. By studying the anticommunist hysteria of 1919-20 students come to understand the historical context in which the "Red Scare" occurred, evaluate the impact of the wartime Espionage Act and Sedition Act on free speech guaranteed in the First Amendment, explain related U.S. Supreme Court decisions, recognize the importance of dissent in a free society, analyze the impact of fear on society, and recognize the long range impact of policy decisions on internal affairs. This unit contains teacher background materials, lesson plans, and student resources and handouts. Descriptors: Communism, Democracy, Ethnocentrism, Freedom of Speech

Doris Marshall Inst. for Education and Action, Toronto (Ontario). (1990). Educating for a Change. An ANC Skillshop in Popular Education. Workshop Manual. This manual provides materials for a 6-day workshop to develop skills in democratic learning and teaching practices. Goals of the workshop are as follows: (1) train facilitators to use the methodology; (2) introduce people in the African National Congress (ANC) to the potential of popular education methodology; (3) determine follow-up action to create a base of interchange of experience; and (4) plan actions necessary to create a core of trainers of trainers. Section A contains a overview of the course, including its objectives and agenda. Section B is a detailed review of each day of the program. It includes a restatement of the objectives for the day, a description of the process used, the activity tasksheets and handouts, and all the knowledge/materials produced by the participants on that day. Titles of the six sessions are as follows: What's It All About; Surveying the Terrain; Working by Design: Part One, Planning an Activity; Working by Design: Part Two, Planning a Workshop/Meeting; The Practice of Facilitation; and Covered Ground and Next Steps. Section C summarizes the methods of evaluation built into the course and the most immediate results of the programs. Descriptors: Adult Education, Change Agents, Change Strategies, Curriculum Development

Chetley, Andrew (1990). El Poder de Cambiar: La Experiencia del Proyecto Costa Atlantica de Colombia (The Power To Change: The Experience of the Atlantic Coast Project in Columbia, 1977-1989). In 1977, the Bernard van Leer Foundation began supporting a project in Colombia that had the objective of improving the quality of early childhood care and education in a small village. The Costa Atlantica project offered an approach to development that was based on community organization, social management, participation, cooperation, popular education, and solidarity in the search for the common good. The project began as an attempt to satisfy the needs of children and expanded to include an alternative approach to overcoming poverty. The project team of about 25 people was aided by university students, and received encouragement and partial financial support from the Colombian Institute for Family Welfare. The team claimed to have provided over 100 communities with some form of preschool and a variety of other developments. Such a claim indicated that something in the communities was transforming largely marginalized and disadvantaged settings into positive developmental environments. This book describes the Costa Atlantica project. Chapters concern background information, the role of the university as an agent of change, the role of the community in development, the transition from local experiment to national policy, and the learning that took place during the experience.   [More]  Descriptors: Change Agents, Community Development, Community Role, Democracy

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